The Brain Structure Of My Walking Disaster  

As of 2011, CDC reported that 11% of children in the United States ages 4 to 17 had been confirmed to have ADHD, and the number continues to rise. Traditionally ADHD has been diagnosed based on a psychological and medical interview, information from school teachers, and a direct observation of a child’s behavior,” according to Arshya Vahabzadeh M.D.

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The School Psychiatrist Can Help Your Kid Succeed In School 

A child with ADHD is expected to have difficulty in school as he will be required to sit still, quietly listen, concentrate, pay attention, and follow instructions.  Their brain power is there, but the difficulty to focus hinders their ability to finish their tasks.   “Typically, jumpiness, inattentiveness, and impulsiveness, behaviors thought to be signs of ADHD, first turn up in a classroom situation,” says Marilyn Wedge Ph.D. Their hyperactivity and too much energy make them incapable of understanding the instructions and they may disrupt the class.  What others do not realize is that they do not do it on purpose, but just that their brains would not let them.    

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Therapist’s Guidance To Teaching ADHD Kids Social Manners

 Children with ADHD are no different than any other regular preschooler age kids.  They got temper tantrums, interrupts you when you’re talking on the phone or when you’re with someone, and shout while on the dinner table to get attention.  It’s just that children with ADHD tend to do things in a quite exaggerated way because of too much energy and they do it quite more often. According to Monnica T Williams Ph.D., “Children with ADHD have difficulty focusing on all but the most engaging tasks, are easily distracted, and need greater stimulation to maintain attention.”

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