ADHD In My Case

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I get a lot of comments about attention deficit hyperactivity disorder or ADHD. Some say it is a condition someone only builds up to grab attention. Some believe that it is just all in mind and that there is nothing to worry about it. Some think that it is not a complicated situation, and all individuals that have it can do something to cure it whenever they want. But I say it is never like that.

The Shame And Stigma Of  ADHD

In the world where everyone doubts you, it becomes impossible not to question yourself as well. According to CARL SHERMAN, PH.D., “People with ADHD tend to have trouble seeing themselves realistically, and the desire to avoid discrimination makes it even harder.” With all the stigma of how people look at the mental condition, everything about it becomes frustrating. It is as if the whole point of ADHD results in an unnoticed amount of shame. It is debilitating. It causes patients an intense amount of negative guilt. With that, people’s perception toward an action of someone with ADHD gets often considered wrong. That no matter how persistent these people try to create a meaningful life, their behavior will ruin everything for them. So with all the debilitating shame coming from people’s unwanted judgment, it becomes someone’s valid reason not to seek help.

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How I Look AT It

I also experience the same kind of judgment from those people who cannot seem to open their minds toward understanding what ADHD is. I know it is not people’s obligation to educate themselves on the medical condition. It is never their fault that some people like me have it. Honestly, that particular instance is what makes me feel vulnerable and weak. It is as if like I will never be anything but a failure. With all the negativity of people’s uneducated view of my condition, every inch of getting better becomes way too impossible. It feels like everything in life contributes significantly to my anxiety, stress, depression, and even addiction.

My ADHD is something I would never wish others to have. Honestly, although some may think that I am lucky to handle the condition well, they do not know how much effort I put in only to make things functional. I made a lot of sacrifices. There are times that I pushed my limits because I do not want people to treat me indifferently. The battles I have with my anger and agitation is the worst of it all. That is because even if I do not want to, I am hurting the people around who love me unconditionally. Unfortunately, that sucks. Psychiatrist Edward (Ned) Hallowell M.D. shares, “I invite you to speculate as to what has worked for you, what rules and tools helped you out most, and then see if what worked for me was what worked for you.”

Insight

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There is nothing someone can instantly do to manage their ADHD. Treatments and medication appear needed in some cases. I cannot also say that the ADHD I have right now is the same as everybody who has it because I know it is not. Every condition is different, as well as their symptoms. But when it comes to getting better, recovery is not just one choice we make. It is a series of life-changing decisions that we create, allowing us to be in control. As what EDWARD HALLOWELL, M.D. quoted, “We need to join the growing movement to celebrate mental diversity, celebrate the full range of what the human mind can do. We need get out from under the dark hood of shame and stigma that have held us back for millennia.”